Bibliography – Digital Humanities

Selected DH research and resources bearing on, or utilized by, the WE1S project.
(all) Distant Reading | Cultural Analytics | Sociocultural Approaches | Topic Modeling in DH


Lee, Ashley S., Poom Chiarawongse, Jo Guldi, and Andras Zsom. “The Role of Critical Thinking in Humanities Infrastructure: The Pipeline Concept with a Study of HaToRI (Hansard Topic Relevance Identifier).” Digital Humanities Quarterly 14, no. 3 (2020). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/14/3/000481/000481.html. Cite
Rambsy, Howard. “African American Scholars and the Margins of DH.” PMLA 135, no. 1 (2020): 152–58. https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2020.135.1.152. Cite
Klein, Lauren F. “Dimensions of Scale: Invisible Labor, Editorial Work, and the Future of Quantitative Literary Studies.” PMLA 135, no. 1 (2020): 23–39. https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2020.135.1.23. Cite
Colavizza, Giovanni. “Are We Breaking the Social Contract?” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020. https://doi.org/10.22148/001c.11828. Cite
Lavin, Matthew J. “Gender Dynamics and Critical Reception: A Study of Early 20th-Century Book Reviews from The New York Times.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020. https://doi.org/10.22148/001c.11831. Cite
Bourrier, Karen, and Mike Thelwall. “The Social Lives of Books: Reading Victorian Literature on Goodreads.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020, 12049. https://doi.org/10.22148/001c.12049. Cite
Jofre, Ana, Josh Cole, Vincent Berardi, Carl Bennett, and Michael Reale. “What’s in a Face? Gender Representation of Faces in Time, 1940s-1990s.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2020. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/12266-what-s-in-a-face-gender-representation-of-faces-in-time-1940s-1990s. Cite
Journal of Cultural Analytics. “Home Page,” 2020. https://culturalanalytics.org/. Cite
African American History, Culture & Digital Humanities (AADHum). “Home Page.” African American History, Culture & Digital Humanities, 2020. https://aadhum.umd.edu/. Cite
Ortega, Élika. “Media and Cultural Hybridity in the Digital Humanities.” PMLA 135, no. 1 (2020): 159–64. https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2020.135.1.159. Cite
Liu, Alan. “Toward a Diversity Stack: Digital Humanities and Diversity as Technical Problem.” PMLA 135, no. 1 (2020): 130–51. https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2020.135.1.130. Cite
Underwood, Ted. “Machine Learning and Human Perspective.” PMLA 135, no. 1 (2020): 92–109. https://doi.org/10.1632/pmla.2020.135.1.92. Cite
Rawson, Katie, and Trevor Muñoz. “Against Cleaning.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities 1019. Debates in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled-f2acf72c-a469-49d8-be35-67f9ac1e3a60/section/07154de9-4903-428e-9c61-7a92a6f22e51#ch23. Cite
Schweitzer, Ivy, and Gordon Henry. “Afterlives of Indigenous Archives.” Afterlives of Indigenous Archives: Essays in Honor of the Occom Circle, 2019. https://digitalcommons.dartmouth.edu/facoa/3983. Cite
Tahmasebi, Nina, Niclas Hagen, Daniel Brodén, and Mats Malm. “A Convergence of Methodologies: Notes on Data-Intensive Humanities Research.” In Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 4th Conference. Helsinki: Nina Tahmasebi, 2019. /publication/2019-aconvergenceofmethods/. Cite
So, Richard Jean, Hoyt Long, and Yuancheng Zhu. “Race, Writing, and Computation: Racial Difference and the US Novel, 1880-2000.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2019. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11057-race-writing-and-computation-racial-difference-and-the-us-novel-1880-2000. Cite
Guiliano, Jennifer, and Carolyn Heitman. “Difficult Heritage and the Complexities of Indigenous Data.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2019, 1041. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11041-difficult-heritage-and-the-complexities-of-indigenous-data. Cite
Da, Nan Z. “The Computational Case against Computational Literary Studies.” Critical Inquiry 45, no. 3 (2019): 601–39. https://doi.org/10.1086/702594. Cite
“The Programming Historian.” Programming Historian, 2019. https://programminghistorian.org/. Cite
Dombrowski, Quinn, Tassie Gniady, and David Kloster. “Introduction to Jupyter Notebooks.” Programming Historian, 2019. https://programminghistorian.org/en/lessons/jupyter-notebooks. Cite
Bode, Katherine. “Why You Can’t Model Away Bias (Pre-Print).” Modern Language Quarterly 80, no. 3 (2019). https://t.co/S7DZHgplsG?amp=1. Cite
Ward, Megan, and Adrian S Wisnicki. “The Archive After Theory.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled-f2acf72c-a469-49d8-be35-67f9ac1e3a60/section/a8eccb81-e950-4760-ba93-38e0b1f2b9d0#ch18. Cite
Bode, Katherine. A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2018. https://www.press.umich.edu/8784777/world_of_fiction. Cite
Russell, Jamal. “The Edition.” WhatEvery1Says Project (WE1S), 2018. https://we1s.ucsb.edu/research/we1s-findings/reports/scoping-research-reports/the-edition/. Cite
Paiella, Giorgina. “The Canon.” WhatEvery1Says Project (WE1S), 2018. https://we1s.ucsb.edu/research/we1s-findings/reports/scoping-research-reports/the-canon/. Cite
Kleymann, Rabea, and Jan-Erik Stange. “Towards Hermeneutic Visualization in Digital Literary Studies,” 2018. http://www.stereoscope.threedh.net/HermeneuticVisualization.pdf. Cite
Guldi, Jo. “Critical Search: A Procedure for Guided Reading in Large-Scale Textual Corpora.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://doi.org/10.22148/16.030. Cite
Lee, James Jaehoon, Blaine Greteman, Jason Lee, and David Eichmann. “Linked Reading: Digital Historicism and Early Modern Discourses of Race around Shakespeare’s Othello.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11034-linked-reading-digital-historicism-and-early-modern-discourses-of-race-around-shakespeare-s-othello. Cite
Underwood, William E., David Bamman, and Sabrina Lee. “The Transformation of Gender in English-Language Fiction.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11035-the-transformation-of-gender-in-english-language-fiction. Cite
Evans, Elizabeth, and Matthew Wilkens. “Nation, Ethnicity, and the Geography of British Fiction, 1880-1940.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11037-nation-ethnicity-and-the-geography-of-british-fiction-1880-1940. Cite
Fyfe, Paul, and Qian Ge. “Image Analytics and the Nineteenth-Century Illustrated Newspaper.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11032-image-analytics-and-the-nineteenth-century-illustrated-newspaper. Cite
Piper, Andrew. Enumerations: Data and Literary Study. Chicago ; London: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. Cite
Padilla, Thomas. “Engaging Absence.” Thomas Padilla, 2018. http://www.thomaspadilla.org/2018/02/26/engaging-absence/. Cite
Liu, Alan, Scott Kleinman, Jeremy Douglass, Lindsay Thomas, Ashley Champagne, and Jamal Russell. “Open, Shareable, Reproducible Workflows for the Digital Humanities: The Case of the 4Humanities.Org ‘WhatEvery1Says’ Project.” In Digital Humanities 2017 Conference Abstracts. Montreal: Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), 2017. Cite
Russell, John E., and Merinda Kaye Hensley. “Beyond Buttonology: Digital Humanities, Digital Pedagogy, and the ACRL Framework | Russell | College & Research Libraries News.” College and Research Libraries 78, no. 11 (2017): 588–600. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.78.11.588. Cite
Smithies, James. The Digital Humanities and the Digital Modern. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. Cite
Bode, Katherine. “The Equivalence of ‘Close’ and ‘Distant’ Reading; or, Toward a New Object for Data-Rich Literary History.” Modern Language Quarterly 78, no. 1 (2017): 77–106. https://doi.org/10.1215/00267929-3699787. Cite
Augst, Thomas. “Archives: An Introduction.” American Literary History 29, no. 2 (2017): 219–27. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/659839. Cite
Gallon, Kim. “Making a Case for the Black Digital Humanities.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, 42–49. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled/section/fa10e2e1-0c3d-4519-a958-d823aac989eb#ch04. Cite
Algee-Hewitt, Mark, Sarah Allison, Marissa Gemma, Ryan Heuser, Franco Moretti, and Hannah Walser. Canon/Archive: Large-Scale Dynamics in the Literary Field. Vol. 11. Stanford Literary Lab Pamphlets. Stanford, CA: Stanford Literary Lab, 2016. https://litlab.stanford.edu/LiteraryLabPamphlet11.pdf. Cite
Fiormonte, Domenico. “Toward a Cultural Critique of Digital Humanities.” In Debaes in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled/section/5cac8409-e521-4349-ab03-f341a5359a34. Cite
Risam, Roopika. “Diasporizing the Digital Humanities: Displacing the Center and Periphery.” International Journal of E-Politics 7, no. 3 (2016): 65–78. https://doi.org/10.4018/IJEP.2016070105. Cite
Thieberger, Nick. “What Remains to Be Done—Exposing Invisible Collections in the Other 7,000 Languages and Why It Is a DH Enterprise.” Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 32, no. 2 (2016): fqw006. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw006. Cite
Algee-Hewitt, Mark, and Mark McGurl. Between Canon and Corpus: Six Perspectives on 20th-Century Novels. Vol. 8. Stanford Literary Lab Pamphlets. Stanford, CA: Stanford Literary Lab, 2015. https://litlab.stanford.edu/LiteraryLabPamphlet8.pdf. Cite
Schweitzer, Ivy. “Native Sovereignty and the Archive: Samson Occom and Digital Humanities.” Resources for American Literary Study 38 (2015): 21–52. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26367559. Cite
Kim, David J. “Archives, Models, and Methods for Critical Approaches to Identities: Representing Race and Ethnicity in the Digital Humanities.” UCLA, 2015. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/9gj619sd. Cite
4humwhatevery1says [Licensed for Non-Commercial Use Only] / How Public Media in the US and UK Compare in Their Terminology For the Humanities, 2015. http://4humwhatevery1says.pbworks.com/w/page/98623971/How%20Public%20Media%20in%20the%20US%20and%20UK%20Compare%20in%20Their%20Terminology%20For%20the%20Humanities. Cite
Risam, Roopika. “South Asian Digital Humanities: An Overview.” South Asian Review 36, no. 3 (2015): 161–75. https://doi.org/10.1080/02759527.2015.11933040. Cite
Amardeep, Singh. “The Archive Gap: Race, the Canon, and the Digital Humanities.” Amardeep Singh, 2015. http://www.electrostani.com/2015/09/the-archive-gap-race-canon-and-digital.html. Cite
tedunderwood. “Seven Ways Humanists Are Using Computers to Understand Text.” The Stone and the Shell, 2015. https://tedunderwood.com/2015/06/04/seven-ways-humanists-are-using-computers-to-understand-text/. Cite