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WE1S to Develop “Research-to-Action Toolkits”

by Abigail Droge
Published January 20, 2020

WhatEvery1Says is excited to announce that the project will be developing and launching a series of Research-to-Action Toolkits in 2020 to present our research findings. Each Toolkit will be structured with a specific audience in mind, ranging from student journalists to state humanities councils, and will consist of a series of “cards”: easy-to-read, one-page synopses […]

Using Grounded Theory to Construct the WE1S Hand-Codebook

by Rebecca Baker
Published January 4th, 2020

Introduction What counts as viable knowledge and “good” scholarship varies considerably from discipline to discipline–and for every scholar working within the context of the digital humanities (or any other humanities field with interdisciplinary inclinations) this eventually means running up against the snarly question of qualitative vs. quantitative data. Despite our reliance on textual evidence, carefully […]

Announcing WE1S Human Subjects Research

Published December 5, 2019

In the spring of 2019, WE1S launched a human subjects research pilot project focused on the role of the humanities in the UCSB community. The Human Subjects Research team (led by postdoc Abigail Droge), formulated a Qualtrics survey inviting undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, staff, and members of the community to share their personal experiences and […]

Word Embeddings of College and University Mission Statements: Preliminary Findings

by Susan (Su) Burtner and Giorgina Paiella
Published August 28, 2019

Introduction   The WE1S Identity and Inclusion team (of which we are a part) is focused on research outputs centered on how gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity factor into humanities discourse. Our core questions of interest include: How are different gender and ethnic groups positioned in relation to the humanities in public discourse? What kind […]

Mapping HSIs, HBCUs, Women’s Colleges, and Tribal Colleges

by Susan (Su) Burtner and Giorgina Paiella
Published August 28, 2019

Introduction   The WE1S Identity and Inclusion team (of which we are a part) is focused on research outputs centered on how gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity factor into humanities discourse. Our core questions of interest include: How are different gender and ethnic groups positioned in relation to the humanities in public discourse? What kind […]

A Digital Humanities Study of Reddit Student Discourse about the Humanities

by Raymond Steding
Published August 1, 2019

A STEM program is not superior to a Liberal Arts program and vice versa. There is a chance for success no matter the route any student takes — Reddit commenter VillageMed This blog post documents how to locate Reddit social media comments that exemplify students’ and graduates’ discourse about the humanities using the tools and […]

Reading in Santa Barbara, Future: Building the Utopian University

by Abigail Droge
Published July 5, 2019

To close out the term for “Reading in Santa Barbara,” we mobilized our insights into past and present reading communities in order to consider possible futures. The final assignment, called “The Utopian University,” asked students to consider the ideal ways that literature could build social relationships on campus and beyond. I share the assignment sheet […]

Reading in Santa Barbara, Present: Students Plan a Public Humanities Showcase

by Abigail Droge
Published July 5, 2019

The climactic moment of our syllabus this quarter in “Reading in Santa Barbara” was a student-run showcase, put on in partnership with the UCSB Reads program. The showcase was an opportunity for students to design and host their own public humanities event, inspired by our quarter-long theme of “reading communities,” the social connections fostered by […]

Reading in Santa Barbara, Past: Finding Archival Communities

by Abigail Droge
Published July 5, 2019

The backbone of “Reading in Santa Barbara” was a series of four archival sessions in UC Santa Barbara’s Special Research Collections. These sessions have allowed us to position our own experiences as readers at UCSB in conversation with the experiences of historical readers more broadly. Throughout, we were concerned with the “reading communities” – or […]