Bibliography – Corpus Representativeness

Selected DH research and resources bearing on, or utilized by, the WE1S project.
(all) Distant Reading | Cultural Analytics | Sociocultural Approaches | Topic Modeling in DH


Rawson, Katie, and Trevor Muñoz. “Against Cleaning.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities 1019. Debates in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled-f2acf72c-a469-49d8-be35-67f9ac1e3a60/section/07154de9-4903-428e-9c61-7a92a6f22e51#ch23. Cite
Schweitzer, Ivy, and Gordon Henry. “Afterlives of Indigenous Archives.” Afterlives of Indigenous Archives: Essays in Honor of the Occom Circle, 2019. https://digitalcommons.dartmouth.edu/facoa/3983. Cite
Daniel, Dominique. “Elusive Stories: Collecting and Preserving the Foreign-Language Ethnic Press in the United States.” Serials Review 45, no. 1–2 (2019): 7–25. https://doi.org/10.1080/00987913.2019.1610148. Cite
Tahmasebi, Nina, Niclas Hagen, Daniel Brodén, and Mats Malm. “A Convergence of Methodologies: Notes on Data-Intensive Humanities Research.” In Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 4th Conference. Helsinki: Nina Tahmasebi, 2019. /publication/2019-aconvergenceofmethods/. Cite
Guiliano, Jennifer, and Carolyn Heitman. “Difficult Heritage and the Complexities of Indigenous Data.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2019, 1041. https://culturalanalytics.org/article/11041-difficult-heritage-and-the-complexities-of-indigenous-data. Cite
Bode, Katherine. “Why You Can’t Model Away Bias (Pre-Print).” Modern Language Quarterly 80, no. 3 (2019). https://t.co/S7DZHgplsG?amp=1. Cite
Ward, Megan, and Adrian S Wisnicki. “The Archive After Theory.” In Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. https://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/read/untitled-f2acf72c-a469-49d8-be35-67f9ac1e3a60/section/a8eccb81-e950-4760-ba93-38e0b1f2b9d0#ch18. Cite
Ali, Samina. “Newspaper Corpus Design and Representativeness Report.” WhatEvery1Says Project (WE1S), 2018. https://we1s.ucsb.edu/research/we1s-findings/reports/scoping-research-reports/newspaper-corpus-design-and-representativeness-report/. Cite
Bode, Katherine. A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2018. https://www.press.umich.edu/8784777/world_of_fiction. Cite
Guldi, Jo. “Critical Search: A Procedure for Guided Reading in Large-Scale Textual Corpora.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://doi.org/10.22148/16.030. Cite
Padilla, Thomas. “Engaging Absence.” Thomas Padilla, 2018. http://www.thomaspadilla.org/2018/02/26/engaging-absence/. Cite
Bode, Katherine. “The Equivalence of ‘Close’ and ‘Distant’ Reading; or, Toward a New Object for Data-Rich Literary History.” Modern Language Quarterly 78, no. 1 (2017): 77–106. https://doi.org/10.1215/00267929-3699787. Cite
Augst, Thomas. “Archives: An Introduction.” American Literary History 29, no. 2 (2017): 219–27. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/659839. Cite
Kirk, Andy. “Talk Slides from Second Tableau 2017 Webinar.” Visualizing Data, 2017. https://www.visualisingdata.com/2017/08/talk-slides-second-tableau-2017-webinar/. Cite
Christie, Michael. “Words, Ontologies and Aboriginal Databases.” Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1177/1329878X0511600107. Cite
Algee-Hewitt, Mark, Sarah Allison, Marissa Gemma, Ryan Heuser, Franco Moretti, and Hannah Walser. Canon/Archive: Large-Scale Dynamics in the Literary Field. Vol. 11. Stanford Literary Lab Pamphlets. Stanford, CA: Stanford Literary Lab, 2016. https://litlab.stanford.edu/LiteraryLabPamphlet11.pdf. Cite
Thieberger, Nick. “What Remains to Be Done—Exposing Invisible Collections in the Other 7,000 Languages and Why It Is a DH Enterprise.” Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 32, no. 2 (2016): fqw006. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqw006. Cite
Onuoha, Mimi. “An Overview and Exploration of the Concept of Missing Datasets. : MimiOnuoha/Missing-Datasets.” MimiOnuoha/missing-datasets (GitHub repo), 2016. https://github.com/MimiOnuoha/missing-datasets. Cite
Algee-Hewitt, Mark, and Mark McGurl. Between Canon and Corpus: Six Perspectives on 20th-Century Novels. Vol. 8. Stanford Literary Lab Pamphlets. Stanford, CA: Stanford Literary Lab, 2015. https://litlab.stanford.edu/LiteraryLabPamphlet8.pdf. Cite
Schweitzer, Ivy. “Native Sovereignty and the Archive: Samson Occom and Digital Humanities.” Resources for American Literary Study 38 (2015): 21–52. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26367559. Cite
Ramirez, Mario H. “Being Assumed Not to Be: A Critique of Whiteness as an Archival Imperative.” The American Archivist 78, no. 2 (2015): 339–56. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26356551. Cite
Kim, David J. “Archives, Models, and Methods for Critical Approaches to Identities: Representing Race and Ethnicity in the Digital Humanities.” UCLA, 2015. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/9gj619sd. Cite
Amardeep, Singh. “The Archive Gap: Race, the Canon, and the Digital Humanities.” Amardeep Singh, 2015. http://www.electrostani.com/2015/09/the-archive-gap-race-canon-and-digital.html. Cite
McFarland, Daniel A, and H Richard McFarland. “Big Data and the Danger of Being Precisely Inaccurate.” Big Data & Society 2, no. 2 (2015): 2053951715602495. https://doi.org/10.1177/2053951715602495. Cite
Dryden, Jean. “The Role of Copyright in Selection for Digitization.” The American Archivist 77, no. 1 (2014): 64–95. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43489586. Cite
Jimerson, Randall C. “Archivists and Social Responsibility: A Response to Mark Greene.” The American Archivist 76, no. 2 (2013): 335–45. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43490358. Cite
Greene, Mark A. “A Critique of Social Justice as an Archival Imperative: What Is It We’re Doing That’s All That Important?” The American Archivist 76, no. 2 (2013): 302–34. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43490357. Cite
Zanish-Belcher, Tanya, ed. Perspectives on Women’s Archives. Chicago, Illinois: Society of American Archivists, 2013. Cite
Sherratt, Tim. “‘A Map and Some Pins’: Open Data and Unlimited Horizons.” Invisible Australians, 2013. http://invisibleaustralians.org/blog/2013/06/%e2%80%98a-map-and-some-pins%e2%80%99-open-data-and-unlimited-horizons/. Cite
Klein, L. F. “The Image of Absence: Archival Silence, Data Visualization, and James Hemings.” American Literature 85, no. 4 (2013): 661–88. https://doi.org/10.1215/00029831-2367310. Cite
Gibbs, Rabia. “The Heart of the Matter: The Developmental History of African American Archives.” The American Archivist 75, no. 1 (2012): 195–204. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23290586. Cite
Mathiesen, Kay. “A Defense of Native Americans’ Rights over Their Traditional Cultural Expressions.” The American Archivist 75, no. 2 (2012): 456–81. https://www.jstor.org/stable/43489632. Cite
Roy, Loriene, Anjali Bhasin, and Sarah K. Arriaga, eds. Tribal Libraries, Archives, and Museums: Preserving Our Language, Memory, and Lifeways. Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2011. Cite
Weingart, Scott B. “Fidelity at Scale: How Time Affects Data.” 2011. https://t.co/y4YeAkUKLT. Cite
Dahlström, Mats. “How Reproductive Is a Scholarly Edition?” Literary and Linguistic Computing 19, no. 1 (2004): 17–33. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/19.1.17. Cite